Birds are pollinators too

May 5, 2021 | Around Ottawa County | 0 comments

Without pollinators, more than 100 crops grown in the United States would not be able to thrive. Plants, including various fruits, vegetables, nuts and more, rely on pollinators to ensure the transport of pollen.

Though many plants are self-pollinating and others are pollinated by the wind or water, many others rely on insects and animals to become pollinated. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says birds, bees, bats, butterflies, moths, flies, beetles, and small mammals all can work as pollinators.

Examples of crops pollinated by pollinators include apples, squash and almonds. Animals and insects help pollinate more than 75 percent of the world’s flowering plants, and nearly 75 percent of all crops, according to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Unfortunately, pesticide use can diminish the number of natural pollinators. Natural gardening and pest-control can help protect the habitats of pollinators.

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